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Sunday Times Parent Power ranks King Edward VI High School for Girls first independent school for academic results in the West Midlands

Parent Power, The Sunday Times Schools Guide 2022, has ranked King Edward VI High School for Girls (KEHS) first for academic results among independent secondary schools in the West Midlands.

The guide, which is available online today and as a printed supplement on Sunday (5th December), has considered schools’ exam results from 2017-2019, preferring not to consider the more recent data from Covid-impacted years.

Second in the West Midlands is Concord College, an international school near Shrewsbury, and third is King Edward’s School (KES), with which KEHS shares its site.

Principal Kirsty von Malaisé said: “We are enormously proud to have been named the top independent school in the West Midlands again; it is the third time in five years that we have been ranked first in a Sunday Times Parent Power listing for the West Midlands. Our consistently outstanding results are not just the result of expert teaching, but also the by-product of our all-round education which inspires the joy of learning. A KEHS education is distinctive in its breadth of opportunities beyond the formal curriculum, with bespoke programmes preparing our students to make a difference locally, nationally or globally in the sphere of their choice.

“With both KEHS and KES featuring in the top three independent schools regionally, we are delighted to be supporting the vision of the King Edward VI Foundation, of which we are a part: to make Birmingham the best place to be educated in the UK.”

The rankings were determined by the average percentage of examination entries in the three years from 2017-2019 gaining A* to B grades at A Level or their International Baccalaureate equivalent (with results at this level given a double weighting) and the average percentage of entries returning 9-7 or A* and A grades at GCSE.

Alastair McCall, editor of Parent Power, said: “We felt it was important to go back to the last sets of moderated public examination outcomes from 2019, 2018 and 2017 to get the most accurate and current view of school academic achievement. By taking a three-year average, we mitigated against relatively poor performance in a one-off year.”